Stop feeling guilty about your parent living in a nursing home

Taking a parent to live in a nursing home is difficult. Many people who ask their parents to move to a skilled nursing facility often hear a flat-out “no!” After all, who wants to leave a home that they know to permanently live in a strange place, especially when they are in their senior years? Adult children are often consumed with guilt when asking a parent to move to a nursing home, thinking that they are upsetting or harming their loved one, that somehow it is abandonment.

Most people come to elder care after an event that makes it difficult or unsafe for the person to live on their own; or it highlights reasons why the elderly person should not have been living on their own for a while now. This can mean that the elderly loved one’s physical health has deteriorated, and other times it can mean that behavior and mental issues resulting from old age or illness have rendered an independent life impossible or dangerous.

No matter how our emotions may cloud reality, the truth of the matter is that your parent is in danger if they remain living alone – you understand that, which is why you are reading this and looking for a solution.

When a loved one is in the winter years of life, we are reminded that our time together is limited. This is especially true for people who have lost one parent already. When people lose a parent, it is a sorrow that never leaves, and they are missed every day. Therefore, when a second parent needs care, the children may feel that they must take on total care responsibilities. After all, if you miss one parent, how can you send the other to live away?

There is no way to change how much time we have together, but what you do have control over is the quality of time spent together rather than the quantity. The reality is that most people are not equipped to provide full-service medical and nursing help to their parents. That is, unless they are healthcare professionals, in which case they are likely busy at work all day. Leaving work to provide around the clock care to a loved one is not a luxury most people have, and no one wants to leave an elderly sick person home alone all day. Isn’t that why you are looking for the perfect nursing home for your parent in the first place?

At the end of the day, your parent’s health, safety, and long-term happiness is most important, and a decision made in service of those things cannot be worthy of guilt.

This Month is the First Ever National Caregivers Day

National Caregivers Day

Mother’s Day is in May; Father’s Day is in June; and Grandparents’ Day is in September – what about the people that take care of the grandparents? Coming up this month is National Caregivers Day, the soon-to-be annual recognition of the trusted people that take care of the elderly and the ill, which is held on the third Friday in February – this year on February 19.

Professional caregivers provide individual attention and treatment management for people who require long-term care or are in hospice care. Caregivers are entrusted with providing elderly and ill people with vital services to keep them going and to do so healthily. A caregiver’s job is to be medically trained and attentive while also providing compassion and companionship to their patients in a long-term nursing home environment, in a short-term rehabilitation setting, or in the patient’s own home.

National Caregivers Day is actually a brand new holiday, being officially established by Providers Association for Home Health & Hospice Agencies (PAHHHA) in 2015. The very first observation of National Caregivers Day will be this year on February 19. However, this day of observation will likely stick around, as there are dates already set and advertised through 2026. This nationwide observation comes on the heels of other caregiver-focused days and months, but those typically focus on family caregivers. Although family caregivers are the most common type in the United States, there is still an army of highly trained professionals that are providing immeasurable care and support.

This is a bandwagon that everyone is encouraged to hop on because it inspires a showing kindness and appreciation for those who work very hard to care for your loved ones. All families who have a loved one receiving care can participate in National Caregivers Day, it just takes a little imagination.

Buy a small gift for the caregiver that shows that your family appreciates their efforts. The gift is not about the monetary amount associated with it, it does not have to be expensive – keep it simple! Do you know if your parents’ caregiver enjoys jogging? Then an iTunes gift certificate can keep them in fresh music to keep their workout fun and challenging. Does the caregiver work long hours, starting early in the morning? Then they would appreciate a gift card to Starbucks to keep themselves caffeinated. National Caregivers Day is all about making a connection with the professionals charged with your loved one’s’ care and expressing gratitude

Robots Make Elder Care the New Frontier

Robots Are the Future of Elder Care

In any economy, it is known that one of the most stable careers is one in medicine and in elderly care. No matter what, people will age and get sick, and therefore require medical care. And as time goes on and people age, they will require specialized care and attention. As constant as they may be, like medicine, elderly care is not immune to change over time and the influence of technology. Cutting edge technology is a strong force in medicine and now it is also making quite a splash in elderly care.

There is a great need for nursing home staff in the United States. By 2020, “direct care” is forecast to be the largest job category in the country. This need inspired the creation of robots and semi-autonomous machines that could provide a helping hand. The robotics company Luvozo created the SAM robot, an autonomous-human hybrid that costs nursing homes only 25 percent of what a qualified human nurse salary would cost, and even this early-stage model is able to perform some of a nurse’s tasks.

SAM helps nurses by moving around the nursing home and checking up on residents, looking for fall hazards like clutter and spills, and it has a link to a caretaker. The robot is even capable of smalltalk about sports and weather, to greet the residents when it enters. At this stage, SAM is a nurse’s assistant at-best. Although SAM is multi-capable, the robot cannot provide any medical care.

SAM has already been tested in a real nursing home. Last summer Luvozo introduced SAM into a Washington, D.C. nursing home with reportedly great results. Observers marveled at how residents quickly adapted to SAM, even asking the robot if it was having a good day. SAM could hit the market nationwide as soon as 2017, with additional features, like the ability for family members to leave video messages for their loved ones.

It is difficult to predict where this kind of elder care technology will lead, but it is clear that this is only the beginning. However, not everyone is comfortable with the idea of robot concierges like SAM. When the current youth grow to become the elderly population, they will be very accustom to having machines and technology all around them – but that is not true for the current older generation. After all, there is nothing like personal attention and contact from a caring person

Research Shows Older Adults have a Secondary Internal Clock

Changes in Sleep with Age

Everyone is familiar with the natural sleep cycle of sleeping at night and being awake during the day, but humans actually have several different natural sleep cycles that come into play during different stages of life. This is especially true for older adults whose internal clocks change with time.

Humans have genes that keep our bodies on a 24-hour cycle. With your eyes closed deep in a cave for several days, your body will be aware of days passing on this cycle and will continue wake/sleep cycles, at least for the first while. These 24-hour genes help wake us up in the morning and put us to sleep at night, cortisol in the morning and melatonin at night. However, for older adults, it seems that these genes do not work in quite the same way.

We have been joking about early bird dinners and grandparents’ naps for so long that researchers took a look at the subject to deduce a scientific explanation for the reason for the disruption of these natural cycles. Researchers looked at the brain tissue from 150 people of all ages, taken immediately after their death. The samples showed which genes were expressed in the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that is behind the forehead and is responsible for memory and cognition, at the moment the person died. These different samples indicated that older people have less rhythmicity in many core clock genes, but why is still a mystery.

This study revealed something else that surprised the researchers. It appears that in older brains, genes were evident that showed another, secondary rhythm that was not present in the younger brains. Scientists are speculating that this may be a “backup clock” when the genes on the original start to fail. After all, an internal clock is nothing to dismiss. An off-kilter clock can disrupt digestion, alter behavioral patterns, and harm sleep and memory.

Researchers are studying what makes our internal clocks tick and what ages over time, both to weaken our internal clocks and to strengthen the secondary clock that is not available to younger people. Scientists and doctors hope that findings from these studies can shed light on why age increases risk for diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as these disease have rhythmic qualities that doctors have been able to identify.

It is important for older adults to stick to a regulated awake-sleep time to maintain strong internal processes and remain healthy.

Long-term care by the numbers

Long Term Care Facilities

Long Term Nursing Care

Long-term care can be confusing and expensive for many people, with little opportunity for perspective. Below is long-term care by the numbers to help you better understand the state of nursing home and rehabilitative care in the U.S. for the elderly population.

8 million elderly U.S. citizens experience difficulty taking care of themselves on a day-to-day basis.

Another 13 million American adults have trouble performing independent activities association with living on their own.

44 percent of men in the U.S. will require long-term care in their lifetimes.

58 percent of women in America will have need long-term care in their lifetimes.

8.5 percent of adults in the U.S. aged 65 years and older reported spending at least one night in a nursing home in the last two years (2010).

Nursing home stays increased by 40 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Home healthcare visits increased by 50 percent during the same time period.

There is a 22 percent probability that a man will need more than one year in a nursing home in his life.

For women, the probability is 36 percent that they will require more than one year in a nursing home in their lifetimes.

2 percent of elderly men require a nursing home stay of at least five years.

Women have a probability of 7 percent of needing a nursing home stay of at least five years.

The average duration of a nursing home stay for a man is 0.88 years.

For women, the average nursing home stay lasts about 1.44 years.

14 percent of Americans 71-years-old and older have dementia.

The rate of dementia among adults 65-years-old is expected to increase by 40 percent from 2015 to 2025.

64 percent of nursing home residents in the U.S. have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other form of dementia.

13.2 percent of Americans who received professional home healthcare in 2010 had long-term care insurance coverage.

Approximately 22 percent of long-term care costs come out-of-pocket.

Medicaid covers 51 percent of long-term care costs.

28 percent of Medicaid funding paid for long-term care costs in 2013.

8 percent of long-term care delivered in America is covered by long-term care insurance.

13 percent of elderly Americans that are covered by long-term insurance.

$7.8 billion in long-term care claims were paid out in 2014.

There are about 43.5 million adult family caregivers that look after someone over 50-years-old.

14.9 million of these adult caregivers provide care for a person with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.

This totals to about $450 billion in unpaid care provided by these caregivers (2009 estimate).

The average caregiver is a female (66 percent) and 48-years-old.

 

Physical activity invaluable for everyone (especially elderly)

Physical activity for elderly

Physical Activity and Elderly

A common belief among elderly people is that they are too old for certain things, or that it is too late. Older people often say that they are too old to learn something new, or too sick to be physically active. However, that is rarely the case, especially when it comes to taking care of ourselves. Health is something we must remain vigilant about, as there are many things people of all ages can do to help themselves, especially after facing health issues.

We often report new findings that support the importance of having physical rehabilitation after having surgery or experiencing a different health episode. Physical therapy and rehabilitation directly impact health outcomes after hospital discharge, but this is also an important lesson for just about everyone.

Exercise can benefit anyone and the same goes for older adults. It is unlikely that you will be making free throws on the basketball court, but even mild physical activity is still important. Being fit directly relates to a person’s ability to age in their homes and remain independent for longer. This is the secret to feeling like you’re 65 when you’re 85, but it’s important to start early.

It’s true that Americans are living longer than ever. In the next decade, more than 89 million people will be 65-years-old or older. This is going to be more than double the number of older people in the U.S. in 2011. Fitness can also lead to a longer life, but it’s really more about quality than quantity. It is important to be healthy in order to be able to enjoy these additional years.

Regular exercise and stretching can reduce risk of falls and broken bones, and it helps people bounce back from medical issues. Older people that have suffered triple bypasses and cancer have found salvation in physical therapy after a health episode, and many continue their commitment to being physically active from there. After all, it does improve your well being mentally, emotionally, as well as physically.

So what qualifies as low intensity exercise? Brisk walking or jogging, for those that are able to jog, and dancing are great aerobic exercises that are generally safe for seniors. Yoga will help keep you limber and flexible and there are many yoga classes designed especially for older people their unique needs. Balance exercise like tai chi can help you prevent falls and remain mentally alert for longer periods.

3 Primary Concerns of the Elderly

Concerns of the Elderly

People of all ages have concerns and worries and these things change and develop over time as we age. All concerns, as different as they may be, stem from desires and hopes. Growing older does not mean entering a carefree time, they just change from the time we are teenagers or parents to young children.

As the child of an elderly parent or a primary caregiver, it is invaluable for you to understand the primary concerns that your parents face, as you are likely a primary caregiver or decider in the care of your loved one. You should know these concerns so you can help ease those worries and help provide peace of mind, and help your loved ones overcome these emotional obstacles. It may also be time to reach out to professionals for assistance with care.

Primary concerns of the elderly:

1. Money

People seemingly worry about money throughout their lives, and the senior years are no different. No one wants to outlive their savings, which is increasingly becoming true. Life expectancy is one the rise and it is wonderful that we are now living longer than ever before. However, this means that our savings have to cover those extra years even while healthcare costs continue to rise. The twilight years require extensive financial planning and changes can cause a lot of worry.

2. Usefulness

It is difficult to see your role in your family and in society shift. Most elderly people have led long, productive lives in which they felt useful. However, once the kids grow up and have kids of their own, elderly people can lose a sense of purpose. To counteract this concern, keep your elderly loved one close and express their value in your life. If possible, let them watch children or help in the kitchen, or engage in another reaffirming activity.

3. Being a burden

In addition to worrying that they are not actively contributing, seniors are concerned with becoming a burden on their loved ones. Growing old means that we become a lot weaker or ill so we can no longer take care of ourselves the way we once did, or do the things we used to. It is often up to the family to pick up the slack and carry the extra weight. Reassure your loved one that they are not a burden and, if necessary, find a suitable solution so that a professional can administer proper care.