3 Primary Concerns of the Elderly

Concerns of the Elderly

People of all ages have concerns and worries and these things change and develop over time as we age. All concerns, as different as they may be, stem from desires and hopes. Growing older does not mean entering a carefree time, they just change from the time we are teenagers or parents to young children.

As the child of an elderly parent or a primary caregiver, it is invaluable for you to understand the primary concerns that your parents face, as you are likely a primary caregiver or decider in the care of your loved one. You should know these concerns so you can help ease those worries and help provide peace of mind, and help your loved ones overcome these emotional obstacles. It may also be time to reach out to professionals for assistance with care.

Primary concerns of the elderly:

1. Money

People seemingly worry about money throughout their lives, and the senior years are no different. No one wants to outlive their savings, which is increasingly becoming true. Life expectancy is one the rise and it is wonderful that we are now living longer than ever before. However, this means that our savings have to cover those extra years even while healthcare costs continue to rise. The twilight years require extensive financial planning and changes can cause a lot of worry.

2. Usefulness

It is difficult to see your role in your family and in society shift. Most elderly people have led long, productive lives in which they felt useful. However, once the kids grow up and have kids of their own, elderly people can lose a sense of purpose. To counteract this concern, keep your elderly loved one close and express their value in your life. If possible, let them watch children or help in the kitchen, or engage in another reaffirming activity.

3. Being a burden

In addition to worrying that they are not actively contributing, seniors are concerned with becoming a burden on their loved ones. Growing old means that we become a lot weaker or ill so we can no longer take care of ourselves the way we once did, or do the things we used to. It is often up to the family to pick up the slack and carry the extra weight. Reassure your loved one that they are not a burden and, if necessary, find a suitable solution so that a professional can administer proper care.